Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Driving forces behind cloud computing

Mark Bentkower, Director of Enterprise Solutions Asia Pacific, CommVault Systems | Dec. 17, 2014
With a new wave of data expected to come from new Internet-enabled devices, the use of virtualised machines and the adoption of cloud-enabled business-critical applications, it is more important than ever for organizations to holistically manage their data and storage more intelligently. Cloud services will be a key element to achieve this. In this article, CommVault discusses the latest trends and services brought by the cloud and how organisations can now seize the opportunity to leverage these new functions to enhance their business capabilities.

Mark Bentkower of CommVault 
Mark Bentkower of CommVault Systems.

As we reflect on the lessons learned through the big-data boom, of how organizations securely capture, store and retrieve data and how they can derive value from these huge data sets; we must begin to prepare for yet another new wave of data. This data will come from millions of new Internet-enabled devices, a continued push towards the use of virtualized machines and the adoption of cloud-enabled business-critical applications.

This volume will make it more important than ever for organizations to holistically manage their data and storage more intelligently, and cloud services will be a key element to achieve this. Although the cloud has been around for a few years now, it is only recently that organizations started to really understand how to leverage it to suit their business needs. More than simply shared hard drives in the sky, today we see an increasing array of enterprise-level cloud services - from virtual computers to fully realized Enterprise applications.

It is now up to organizations to seize the opportunity to leverage on the latest trends and services brought by the cloud in order to enhance their business capabilities.

Leveraging cloud as a service
We predict that enterprises, rather than continuing to spend capital in their own datacenters, will become increasingly comfortable utilizing big public cloud providers, such as Amazon Web Services(AWS), Microsoft Azure, Dimension Data and RackSpace. The cloud is becoming more adept at allowing the use of data-intensive applications, e.g. SharePoint, Oracle or SAP. As we near the end of 2014, most organizations are knowledgeable about all of the different cloud service models (Infrastructure IaaS, Platform PaaS, and Storage SaaS) and the focus for 2015 appears to be moving up the stack towards the application layer. In response, providers will likely grow their application-as-a-service offerings, providing a broader range of alternatives to the traditional on-premises infrastructure.

Organizations should, therefore, already start researching the right vendors, begin executing their cloud strategy, and get used to managing the IaaS layer. 2015 will also undoubtedly see PaaS in its zenith. Recent trends show an increasing number of organizations investing resources into implementing guardrails around their cloud environments so that developers can consume cloud services in a secure and compliant manner. At the same time, they are also - or should be - either evaluating PaaS or doing a proof of concept with one or more PaaS platforms.

It is now time for applications and developers to enter the ring. Ultimately, this move to manage some resources in-house and put others into the cloud will reinforce the need for a hybrid cloud strategy.

 

1  2  3  Next Page 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.