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Q&A with Oracle’s Christopher G. Chelliah: Move to big data decision-making is inevitable

Zafar Anjum | Jan. 9, 2014
There is no doubt that the move to big data decision-making is inevitable and compelling. However, with the level of vendor-noise around big data, most companies fail in these projects with their approach, says Christopher G. Chelliah, Vice President and Chief Architect, Exadata & Strategic Solutions at Oracle Asia Pacific in this interview.

Chris Chelliah

Christopher G. Chelliah, Vice President and Chief Architect, Exadata & Strategic Solutions at Oracle Asia Pacific

There is no doubt that the move to big data decision-making is inevitable and compelling.  However, with the level of vendor-noise around big data, most companies fail in these projects with their approach, says Christopher G. Chelliah, Vice President and Chief Architect, Exadata & Strategic Solutions at Oracle Asia Pacific in this interview.

According to a recent survey, even though Singapore businesses generally agree that big data will provide them with a competitive edge, the adoption rate of it is still low. Why? Is it lack of proven ROI? Is it culture?

There are a number of factors impeding the adoption of big data amongst businesses today - the two most prevalent issues being:

1.      Organisations understanding what they want to get out of it.

2.      Monetising a business case (ROI) to justify these projects.

Indeed, the dearth of analytics skills and the lack of knowledge to get the most value out of big data are possibly some of the key barriers to adoption. Skills within the organisations had been the primary inhibitor for issue #1, however we are seeing a change in mindset.  The business teams in our customer organisations are looking outside of the four walls of their data centre for how they can improve and optimize the business.  As most IT shops in Singapore are already well established, this is the next step for competitive differentiation.

We're seeing a whole new set of conversations in the manufacturing sector (real-time quality systems), financial sector (risk and anti-money laundering or AML measures) and telco sector (sentiment and campaign analysis) taking place.  Not all these are initially labeled as "big data" projects - but are heavily reliant on high-speed, high-velocity correlation between structured and un-structured data.  These projects are starting to see funding, and they are big data!

At Oracle we have pole position in these customer conversations - it is inherently a data management problem they are trying to solve.  We have a compelling single-stack solution that supports hadoop and no-SQL for unstructured data and seamlessly integrates these sources with the established relational (Oracle) databases already within the customer's organisation.  This technology stack makes adopting big data approaches evolutionary rather than making sweeping changes in the current standard operating environments our customers already have.  By taking a step-based investment approach, we can help customers overcome #2 - the ROI issue[i] - because most of what they need is already in-house!

Do you think the attitude of companies to big data will change in the region anytime soon?

 

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