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Extreme takes aim at secure mobile networking

Tim Greene | March 1, 2011
Extreme Networks is going mobile. The company today wheeled out a roadmap that will steer the company's product line toward mobile device and application access, availability and management support.

FRAMINGHAM 1 MARCH 2011 - Extreme Networks is going mobile. The company today wheeled out a roadmap that will steer the company's product line toward mobile device and application access, availability and management support.

The idea is for the company to catch businesses' shift to mobile devices by customizing networks to meet the demands of the devices, mobile applications and corporate security, the company says in announcing its plan at the Enterprise Connect conference on unified communications this week.

The initiative, called Make Your Network Mobile, is divided into five phases. The first is defined by Extreme products as they exist today, and the fifth is marked by its switches having intelligence about users' identities and the devices they are using in order to enforce access and service quality policies uniformly across and among entire networks.

Phase 2, which will roll out during the course of this year, calls for providing identity management tools that can determine who users are, what device they are using and what resources they are authorized to use.

The tools will make it possible to enforce these rules, but not end-to-end, says David Ginsburg, the company's new senior vice president of strategic marketing. Networks in this phase will be marked by pockets identity awareness only, he says, and switch ports that will be configured automatically based on policies.

These pockets will be tied together in Phase 3, which Ginsburg says will start rolling out in 2012, and will involve adding a policy and control layer to network management to provide identity management features. This will likely be achieved by partnering for a policy-management layer in its software.

This phase will also include efforts to flatten Extreme's data-center architecture from five tiers to three, he says. This includes pulling virtual switch functionality away from hypervisors and putting it into Extreme's top-of-rack switches.

The company also says it will boost the density of data center switches later this year in an effort to combine the aggregation and core switching tiers into one, according to Ginsburg. He says the company will look to other hardware vendors to provide gear that enables top-of-rack switches to interface with a dispersed switching fabric within the data center.

Phase 4 brings this identity management into cloud infrastructures, so if a business application on a virtual machine in a private network migrated to a server in a cloud network, end users would automatically be able to reach the new instance of the application without knowing about the move, he says.

 

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