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Oracle burnishes its Lustre

Joab Jackson | Dec. 13, 2010
While a number of small companies have been ramping up support for a file system called Lustre that Oracle acquired in its Sun Microsystems purchase earlier this year, Oracle itself has no plans to abandon the technology, a company executive told the IDG News Service in an interview.

Despite these warning signs, Oracle remains committed to Lustre, Schaffer said. Oracle plans to continue to maintain "the canonical branch" of the software, and make it available. "We have no plans to deviate from that role and we also do not have plans to create a private branch of the code," he said.

Schaffer noted that the company is working to integrate Lustre with another Sun file system, the 128-bit ZFS (Zettabyte File System), so that Lustre can be used with ZFS on the company's storage devices. It does plan to roll these changes back into the canonical, or open-source, version of the software, he notes.

Another positive sign is that Oracle set up a booth at the Supercomputer 2010 show, held last month in New Orleans. Other companies at the event demonstrated their continued interest in Lustre as well. Hewlett-Packard showed off its Unified Cluster Portfolio, a collection of pre-integrated hardware, software and services that can run Lustre. DataDirect Networks provides HP with the support for Lustre, said Alanna Dwyer, HP clusters marketing manager.

Dell also offers Lustre on a number of its storage systems, said Donnie Bell, Dell senior manager of product marketing, at the show. Dell works through software provider Terascala to offer this capability. "Lustre is pretty complicated stuff. Terascala helped us bring parallel file systems to those who have never been able to touch it before," Bell said.

 

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