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Facebook subscribe button makes my Facebook page obsolete

Tony Bradley | Sept. 18, 2011
Perhaps you've heard that Facebook has been tweaking the social network a bit? In the past few weeks Facebook has implemented a wide variety of changes--many of which mimic popular features from the rival Google+, and at least one of which leaves me with little reason to continue maintaining my Facebook Page.

Perhaps you've heard that Facebook has been tweaking the social network a bit? In the past few weeks Facebook has implemented a wide variety of changes--many of which mimic popular features from the rival Google+, and at least one of which leaves me with little reason to continue maintaining my Facebook Page.

Facebook Subscriptions

Facebook finally added Subscriptions for personal profiles.

What is a Facebook Subscription you may ask? By opening up Subscriptions on my personal Facebook profile, I enable anyone who chooses to subscribe to my profile to see any posts I share with "Public".

When I first started using Facebook, I wanted to be able to share information and post links to my articles, but only those in my social network would be able to see those links and updates. Facebook has controls to allow me to filter my posts, but they've never been very easy to use. Basically, when I post something on my Facebook profile, everyone in my Facebook social network can see it.

I didn't want to share everything in my life with random strangers, and I didn't want to have to accept every one of my readers into my social network, so I created a Facebook Page. The Facebook Page is my public persona on Facebook, but now with Facebook Subscriptions I don't really need the Facebook Page anymore.

Borrowing from Twitter (or Google+)

In essence, Facebook Subscriptions adopts the Twitter model. Where Facebook has been about creating a more personal social network with family members and old high school friends, Twitter is a much more exhibitionist / voyeuristic social network in which anyone can follow anyone else and see everything they post.

It is possible to use Twitter to communicate with friends, family, and colleagues--either in a conversation open to the public, or in personal Direct Messages--and there are some controls available to lock Twitter down if you choose. But, the basic model is that I post every silly thought in my head--140 characters at a time--and random strangers who follow me will see those arbitrary thoughts show up in their Twitter feed.

When Google launched the Google+ social network, it created a sort of hybrid of Twitter and Facebook. Google+ also lets you put others in Circles (a.k.a. "follow") who are not part of your social network. The Circles concept, and the ability to choose who will see a given post on a case by case basis enable me to switch seamlessly between sharing personal information with family and close friends, and posting tech news, sports highlights, and other items that interest me to the public at large.

Easier and More Engaging

 

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