Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Viewing a Web page isn't copyright infringement, top EU court rules

Loek Essers | June 6, 2014
Europeans can continue browsing the Web without fear of breaking copyright law, Europe's top court has determined in a landmark ruling.

The EU's top court found that the copies that are inherently made when people browse the Internet do not violate copyright law, and that people do not need permission from a copyright holder to view Web content. The EU law must be interpreted as meaning that the copies on the user's computer screen and the copies in the 'cache' of that computer's hard disk are covered by the exception for temporary acts of reproduction of the EU Copyright Directive, the court ruled.

"This is a crucial judgment," said Jakob Kucharczyk, Brussels director of the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA) in a response to the ruling. "Any other ruling would essentially mess up the Internet for European citizens."

"Despite the ruling, one cannot overstate how irrational this case was to begin with. It's hard to believe the question at stake was whether browsing the Internet is legal or not," he said, adding that it may be time for a change of the EU's copyright regime. "This was not the first copyright case challenging the foundations of Internet use, and policymakers will have to ensure that copyright rules will not continue to threaten the growth in the Internet economy."

"This is a huge step in the right direction for the courts as they seek ways to deal with the thorny issues of Internet use and copyright law," PRCA Director General Francis Ingham said in a statement, adding that the NLA's attempts to charge for reading online content do not just affect the public relations world, but the fundamental rights of EU citizens to browse the Internet.

"This ruling serves the interests of business, technology and millions of Internet users and ensures protection from being accused of copyright infringement," Jorn Lyseggen, CEO of Meltwater, said in a statement.

The NLA said in its statement it was pleased that the principle that publishers should be fairly remunerated for use of their copyrighted content has been upheld throughout the court cases. The net economic effect of this judgment for newspaper and magazine publishers should be neutral, it said, adding that negotiated commercial solutions that recognize and meet the needs of all parties are the way forward.

 

Previous Page  1  2 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.