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Microsoft defers to outside dev for stuck Windows Phone fix

Gregg Keizer, Computerworld | May 5, 2011
Microsoft said it will not help Windows Phone users who updated their smartphones last month with an unsanctioned tool and are now unable to apply a security update.

Microsoft on Wednesday said it will not help Windows Phone users who updated their smartphones last month with an unsanctioned tool and are now unable to apply a security update.

Instead, Microsoft has worked with Chris Walsh, the developer of "ChevronWP7.Updater," to make sure a workaround he created will do the trick.

In a post to a Microsoft company developer blog, Brandon Watson, senior director with the Windows Phone team, informed customers that Microsoft would not directly assist anyone who had run Walsh's tool last month.

"We cautioned that phones which were updated via this method were not going to be able to update past build 7390," said Watson, referring to March's "NoDo" update. "Unfortunately for those customers out there who acted on information from sources outside of Microsoft, the rubber meets the road today."

Saying, that the company hadn't figured on needing to deal with such a situation and that it had no engineering resources to spare, Watson said, "While we are not ruling out having a fix in the future, for now there is no fix."

Microsoft had warned users this might happen.

After Walsh created ChevronWP7.Updater in April -- a move in response to Microsoft's slow pace in getting out two updates, including one dubbed "NoDo," to customers -- a company executive said anyone who ran ChevronWP7.Updater risked not receiving future updates. Microsoft also asked Walsh to remove the tool from his blog, which he did.

"We cautioned that phones which were updated via this method were not going to be able to update past build 7390," said Watson, referring to the "NoDo" update. "Unfortunately for those customers out there who acted on information from sources outside of Microsoft, the rubber meets the road today."

Watson said that anyone who had used ChevronWP7.Updater would not be able to update past NoDo, and would not be able to retrieve and install the security update Microsoft shipped Tuesday.

That claim runs counter to reports from some users, including Walsh, who said that they were able to download and install Tuesday's security update.

According to Watson, users who "walshed" their phones -- Walsh's name has become a verb -- would need to return their handsets to their carriers for replacements.

"Our engineering priorities are focused on improving the process by which updates get to Windows Phone, issuing the security update you just got and working to get Mango to market. Undoing this specific problem was not in our schedule," said Watson.

 

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