Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Hot security startups to watch

Tim Greene | June 8, 2016
Simulating attacks, defending the Internet of Things and keeping track of suspicious device reconfigurations are among technologies young companies are fleshing out.

Headquarters: Sunnyvale, Calif.
Founded:
2014
Funding:
$4M from Sequoia Capital and Shlomo Kramer (see Cato Networks and Indegy, above)
Leaders:
  CEO Guy Bejerano
Fun fact: The company’s CTO and its top researcher recently released what they call “the perfect exfiltration”, which seems counter to the company’s commercial goals.

Why we’re following it: SafeBreach constantly tests networks for weaknesses that by themselves don’t endanger security but in combination with others could. It makes the connections that might lead to a successful attack so customers can fix them. This is the hacker’s approach to breaching networks, and SafeBreach has developed a hackers’ playbook its platform runs through to probe customer networks.

Seceon

Headquarters: Westford, Mass.
Founded:
2015
Funding:
Private
Leaders:
  CEO Chandra Pandey and CSO Gary Southwell
Fun fact: The name is a portmanteau of security and eon meant to convey never-ending security.

Why we’re following it:  With the growing belief that breaches are inevitable, stopping them quickly is an important defense in order to limit damage. Seceon does this but also can automate responses to shorten the time the attack is effective by triggering third-party devices on the network to block threats. It also makes associations that otherwise would have to be made manually, freeing up human analysts from mundane chores.

Simility

Headquarters: Palo Alto, Calif.
Founded:
2014
Funding:
$7.2 million from Accel Partners, Trinity Ventures and angel investors.
Leaders:  CEO Rahul Pangam, CTO Kedar Samant and Uttam Phalnikar
Fun fact: The founders were part of Google’s fraud detection group.

Why we’re following it: Simility tries to address the increasing problem of credit card and online banking fraud with a service that issues risk scores about transactions. It does so fast enough to enable cutting off these attacks mid-transaction, which will help cut down on losses suffered by victims of this type of criminal activity.

Trusona

Headquarters: Scottsdale, Ariz.
Founded:
2015
Funding:
$8 million from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers
Leaders:
 CEO Ori Eisen, former fraud detection chief at American Express
Fun fact:
 Frank Abagnale, the former con-man and subject of the movie “Catch Me If You Can” is a consultant to the company.

Why we’re following it: Trusona has put together a four-factor authentication scheme involving anti-cloning technology and a dongle for which customers must identify themselves in person. While not priced for everyday consumer use, it may find a following among executives who may be targeted by whale phishers and to protect monetary and intellectual property assets.

Upguard

Headquarters: Mountain View, Calif.
Founded:
2012
Funding:
Private from Peter Thiel, Dave McClure and Scott Petry.
Leaders:
  co CEOS Mike Baukes and Alan Sharp-Paul
Fun fact: The company lists its team by musical instrument, as if they played in a band.

 

Previous Page  1  2  3  4  Next Page 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.