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Intel's RealSense 3D camera technology is already the star of IDF

James Niccolai | Aug. 19, 2015
Intel is promoting its computer vision technology hard at IDF.

It can then display ads targeted to that person on a transparent video display on the front of the machine. And because RealSense supports gesture control, the person can order from the machine without actually touching it.

It’s one of those technologies that seems to be looking for a problem to solve - vending machines might not be it. But Krzanich said a touch-free interface could also be useful in a sterile environment like a hospital.

Vending machine maker N&W plans to produce 5,000 of the RealSense vending machines next year, Krzanich said.

He also showed a mirror for stores that allows people to try an item of clothing in different colors without actually trying it on. The RealSense camera locates the person in front of the mirror, and software changes the color of the item they're wearing.

RealSense mirror
A mirror for stores that can let people try on clothes in different colors without getting changed. 

The Intel chief showed a few new technologies for PC users too.

He demonstrated a technology developed with Microsoft called Wake on Voice that allows a computer to listen for voice commands even when it’s in sleep mode, so a user can wake the PC instantly with a voice command without touching it.

The companies are integrating the technology with Microsoft’s Cortana assistant so a user will be able to walk up to a Windows 10 PC and say “Hey Cortana, wake up,” and the PC will instantly start working.

Wake on Voice will be integrated with all of Intel’s families of client processors, including its Core and Atom chips.

Intel also showed a wristband that can authenticate a user on a PC and unlock the system simply by having the person walk up to the PC.

The person wearing the wristband has to log into the PC manually the first time, typing a password. The PC then sends an authentication token to the wearable, and it unlocks the PC each subsequent time the user is nearby, using Bluetooth Low Energy.

When the user takes the wristband off, the authentication token disappears, and a manual log-in is necessary.

"This proof of concept shows that wearables can solve the password problem with enterprise-grade security and consumer-level usability," according to Krzanich.

It uses one of a handful of new SDKs that Intel is providing to developers this week. The authentication service is being standardized now by the Bluetooth Special Interest Group, Krzanich said.

Intel will say more about the new tools it has for developers during the course of the week. It's trying to nurture a "maker" feel at the event, with plenty of computerized toys and robot cars around for people to play with.

And there is barely a PC or a server in sight.

 

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