Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Facebook streamlines the login process with Instant Verification

Michael Simon | Dec. 22, 2016
Android users will be able to sign into Facebook-linked apps quicker.

Facebook users everywhere know that their account is the key to unlocking all sorts of apps and services on their phones, but remembering lengthy passwords and entering one-time SMS codes can be a pain. A new login process is about to make it a whole lot easier for Android users.

Called Instant Verification, Facebook is giving developers the ability to streamline account logins by eliminating the need to type or remember anything other than a phone number. The exclusive Android feature is part of a new Account Kit update designed primarily for users in areas with spotty SMS service, working in tandem with Facebook Login to deliver a speedy verification process:

“When a person enters his/her phone number into an app using Account Kit, via Android services, we attempt a match with the verified phone number listed on the person's Facebook profile. This is only possible if the person is logged into the Facebook app on the same device. If there is a match, we can complete the verification without sending a one-time password via SMS, making the sign-in flow more seamless.”

While Android users will certainly benefit from the frictionless process, Instant Verification will no doubt appeal to developers and advertisers looking to get users quickly signed up. In initial testing, Facebook claims instant verification has a 97 percent conversion rate, and cites location-sharing app Familonet’s 5 percent boost as a testament to its success.

Why this matters: Your Facebook login is quickly becoming the most important account on your phone, and anything that makes it easier to sign in across all of our apps is certainly a welcome change. But bear in mind, as more and more services become linked to your Facebook account, it is increasingly crucial to have a strong password that changes every few months.

 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.