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German gov't proposes telecom data retention law

Loek Essers | May 29, 2015
German telecom and Internet operators could once again be forced to store customer traffic and location metadata for police investigation purposes, five years after a previous data retention law was declared unconstitutional.

"The government is obviously trying to push the law through parliament," he said. It only took a couple of months to prepare this draft while a normal legislative process takes several months or maybe years, he said, adding that the law could be approved before the parliament's summer recess starts at the end of June. By fast-tracking the legislation process, the government is trying to avoid a public debate, Tripp said.

A spokeswoman for the Ministry of Justice and Consumer Protection declined to comment on timing and said the process is now in the hands of the Bundestag.

Germany is not the only country struggling with data retention. In the Netherlands, where the national data retention law was scrapped by a court because it was found to violate fundamental privacy rights, the government is looking to introduce a new one as soon as possible.

The Swedish government meanwhile maintains that its data retention law can still be applied, while in the U.K. a new data retention law was rushed through by the U.K. government after the CJEU ruling. That law will be reviewed by the country's High Court to determine if it violates human rights.

 

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