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Growing crop of Nexus 6P users report serious battery drop-off issues

Michael Simon | Dec. 22, 2016
Many are claiming sudden shut-downs at random intervals, even when the battery indicator is over 50 percent.

One of the best reasons for buying a Nexus phone has always been the promised timely updates to the latest version of Android, but Nougat hasn’t been as sweet as some Nexus 6P users thought it would be. For months, there have been widespread complaints over decreased battery life, and even after the 7.1 update, things haven’t gotten any better.

In a detailed report by Android Police, it seems that users have taken to Google’s forums to register their complaints, with hundreds of posts describing similar issues to the one commenter Wey Yeoh describes: “My phone’s battery life is average, I wouldn’t say incredible, but one issue which seems to happen is it gets down to 15% and then suddenly goes to 0% almost immediately.”

nexus 6p battery drop-off 

As Google commenter Wey Yeoh shows in this screenshot, battery life falls off a cliff when the Nexus 6P reaches a certain point.

Numerous others echo Why Yeoh’s complaints, with some saying the issue persists even after a clean install of Marshmallow. The problem has more than 1100 stars and 400 posts in Google’s issue tracker, with some users saying the phone shuts down even when the battery indicator shows more than 50 percent remaining. Additionally, several of the complaints note that the issue was exaggerated by exposing their phones to extremely cold temperatures.

Google has thus far been mum on the issue, but a few scattered comments say that the 7.1.1 update fixes the issue. However, there isn’t enough evidence to conclude that the issue has been solved.

Why this matters: As Android Police points out, there larger issue here is one of safety. We’ve become incredibly reliant on out phones as navigational and communication tools, and if they unexpectedly shut off, it could leave users stranded with no way of contacting someone who can help. 

 

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