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The year in fraud: 2015 by the numbers

Jen A. Miller | Dec. 16, 2015
It's that time of year: Round ups, hot takes and eulogies for the year abound.

6

When United Airlines announced is bug bounty program, they got a response from Randy Westergren. And then...well, he says that the airline waited six months to implement the fix, and only did so after he threatened to out the vulnerability. The hole allowed hackers change anything about another passenger's reservation, and was (finally) patched on Nov. 14. 

215,000,000

Phishing via your home email address to get a hold of your personal information became so passé in 2015. Instead, hackers targeted business email addresses with the hopes and tapping into corporate coffers. They had some success: $215 million of it, according to the FBI. 

85-90

When looking that what could be identifying factors for a fraudster trying to shop online with someone else's information, Sift Science found the highest rates of fraud among users ages 85 to 90 years old. This doesn't mean senior citizens are suddenly becoming super criminals. Most likely, fraudsters are pretending to be seniors so they appear to be trusting. 

60 percent

Hackers are good - and fast. According to the Verizon 2015 Data Breach Investigations Report, hackers were able to compromise an organization within minutes 60 percent of the times they tried. In more than 75 percent of cases, the time to discover such breaches took days. This delay shows why such attacks can go from bad because they happened to worse because organizations didn't know about it right away. 

15,000,000

In April, 25 suspected criminals who stole over $15,000,000 ran smack into the law. Romanian authorities detained the group, who allegedly hacked into banks and cloned payment cards. In one instance, they took $9 million from ATMs in Japan. Authorities might not have gotten everyone though. They the group has more than 52 members.

Source: CSO 

 

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