Subscribe / Unsubscribe Enewsletters | Login | Register

Pencil Banner

Android stutters while iOS shines during Q1

Mikael Ricknäs | May 28, 2015
Sales of Android smartphones were up in the first quarter but its share of the market fell, while that of iOS grew for the third consecutive quarter.

Sales of Android smartphones were up in the first quarter but its share of the market fell, while that of iOS grew for the third consecutive quarter.

Overall, the market grew 19.3 percent year on year, with 336 million smartphones sold to end users worldwide, according to Gartner.

Android's share fell by 1.9 percentage points to 78.9 percent, while iOS grew from a 15.3 percent share to 17.9 percent. The year-on-year changes hide an even sharper short-term fall for Android, from 83.1 percent in the third quarter last year, and a stronger rise for iOS, from 12.7 percent before sales of the iPhone 6 took off.

China was a key battlefield during the first quarter, as strong iPhone sales had an impact on Android's performance in that country. Android's volumes fell by 4 percent year on year in China for the first time, according to Gartner.

On Tuesday, IDC offered its take on what the future holds for the smartphone market, and said the developments during the first quarter are likely to continue. This year, for the first time, Android will grow more slowly than overall smartphone sales, the market research company said.

There are more reasons than just a slowing sales growth for Google to worry. Up and coming smartphone makers — such as Lenovo, Huawei Technologies, Xiaomi and Micromax — are using interfaces that stray far from the stock version of Android. At the same time competition over the services that these smartphones come with is increasing. So, Google wanting to expand Android to other platforms, such as cars and TVs, isn't a surprise from that point of view.

The first quarter wasn't just a fight between between Android and iOS, but also between Samsung Electronics and Apple. After rapid sales of the iPhone 6 put Apple ahead at the end of 2014, Samsung once again took the top spot during the first quarter, selling 81.1 million [m] smartphones versus Apple's 60.2 million [m]. But the gap, compared to a year earlier, was halved from more than 40 million [m] to about 20 million [m] units, according to Anshul Gupta , research director at Gartner.

This doesn't necessarily mean Apple will become the biggest smartphone maker in the world on a permanent basis. The worldwide smartphone market is still expanding due to growth coming from sales of low and mid-range smartphones in emerging markets, so it's not going to be easy for Apple to take a leadership position while only focusing on the premium market, Gupta said. Of course, all this doesn't prevent Apple from making a ton of money. The company made a US$13.6 billion [b] profit during its last quarter, in large part thanks to iPhone sales.

 

1  2  Next Page 

Sign up for Computerworld eNewsletters.