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Misfit Ray review: This fitness band looks like a bracelet, but trades function for style

Caitlin McGarry | June 10, 2016
Misfit's focus on fashion hobbles the Ray, which relies on vibration and LED lights to communicate with you.

The Ray just isn’t that accurate at collecting that data. You specify in the app how you’re wearing the device, which can be strapped around your wrist like a normal fitness tracker or removed from its band and worn on a pendant around your neck. You can also swap out the sport band for a leather one, for an extra $20. Tracking movement from around the neck would be a little dicey, I think, but even worn in typical fashion on the wrist, the Ray never nailed my sleep times or running mileage. Instead of the 3.2 miles I usually run in the morning, the Ray overestimated my mileage by a lot—3.7, usually. I would move around before bed so the Ray knew I wasn’t sleeping, and yet it would still peg my bedtime as being hours earlier than it actually was.

I’m accustomed to wearing fitness trackers to bed to get an overview of my sleep (which is almost disturbingly peaceful). But the Ray kept waking me up in the night, because I could feel aluminum cylinder pressing into the skin on my wrist.

The bottom line

As far as undercover activity trackers go, the Ray is definitely more subtle than the Fitbits and Jawbones of the world. But sacrificing accuracy for the sake of style just leads to irritation.

I prefer the subtlety of fitness bands that look like analog watches—the Withings Activité Steel is a particular favorite of mine. A useful fitness tracker shows you your progress with just a glance at your wrist. If it tells the time, even better. A vibrating alarm and text notifications are the organic cherries on top of a super-healthy sundae made with frozen yogurt instead of good ice cream.

I get what Misfit is going for. I just don’t think the Ray is the best $100 activity tracker on the market—not even for the style-conscious.

 

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