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Rustock take-down proves botnets can be crippled, says Microsoft

Gregg Keizer | July 5, 2011
More than half of the PCs once infected with spamming malware now clean.

Microsoft believes the Rustock operator resides in either St. Petersburg or Moscow in the Russian Federation; last month it published legal notifications in those cities' newspapers.

Although Boscovich said it was unlikely the defendants would step forward, he sounded confident that, with the information on the seized servers and other investigations, someone would be held accountable for Rustock.

"We think we can do some more to identify the individuals to zone in on the actual defendants in this case," Boscovich said. "I believe there's a strong likelihood [that we'll identify someone], but it's not a guarantee."

 

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