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Think North Korea hacked Sony? Think about this

Martyn Williams | Dec. 22, 2014
There's a lot of circumstantial evidence, but very little actual information on the hack against Sony.

North Korea or not? There's still a lot we don't know about the attack on Sony Pictures and those behind it.

After two weeks of investigations, anonymous government officials told some reporters and politicians on Wednesday that North Korea was behind the attacks. But on Thursday, U.S. officials resisted making the same allegations in public and didn't release any evidence to back up the anonymous claims.

North Korean involvement is certainly possible. After all, defectors have spoken about North Korea's cyber attack force and training. But it also plays into a popular and easy-to-believe narrative about the country.

There certainly appears to be circumstantial evidence, but it could be just that. So before calling case closed, here are some reasons to be wary, at least until some evidence is made public.

It's unlike any hack attributed to North Korea in the past

North Korea has been blamed for a string of hacks in the past, and it's generally accepted that the country has the capability to hack and attack companies. But no previous attack attributed to North Korea -- or any nation-state -- has been so public and so noisy. In the past, attacks happened, North Korea was suspected, and then sometimes the country was later blamed. It rarely said anything, except for an initial denial. This time around, the hacker group has posted messages online taunting Sony and telling the FBI they cannot be caught. Early on, they were also interacting with reporters.

It is, however, very similar to plenty of hacker activist attacks made against major corporations and governments and -- it's worth noting -- against North Korean Internet sites in May 2013. In those attacks, thousands of user names and passwords for North Korean news site "Uriminzokkiri" were leaked by hackers operating under the "Anonymous" banner.

The hackers didn't mention "The Interview" at first

If the hack was all about stopping the release of "The Interview," why didn't that come up earlier? For the first couple of weeks, the messages that accompanied leaked data didn't mention the movie at all. It was much more about Sony and its executives -- something underlined by the vindictiveness of the leaks.

Here's a key paragraph from a message sent on Nov. 30 to an IDG News Service reporter from the same e-mail address used to leak the first cache of Sony data:

"Sony and Sony Pictures have made terrible racial discrimination and human rights violation, indiscriminate tyranny and restructuring in recent years. It has brought damage to a lot of people, some of whom are among us. Nowadays Sony Pictures is about to prey on the weak with a plan of another indiscriminate restructuring for their own benefits. This became a decisive motive of our action. We required Sony Pictures to stop this and pay proper monetary compensation to the victims."

 

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